Vancouver Island Photo Tours

Rolf Hicker & Family / We are Sustainable, Ethical & Private

Experience the northern part of Vancouver Island like only a few do. These packages are only suggestions, contact me with your requirements so I can put a custom package together for you.

sustainability certified

Vancouver Island Photo Tours

Rolf Hicker
1003 Ocean Place
Port McNeill, British Columbia
V0N 2R0, Canada

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🗣️ Language of Bears: Grizzly bears communicate through a variety of vocalizations, body language, and scent markings. From growls and roars to woofs and huffs, these expressive creatures use a complex language to convey their intentions and emotions. That said no sound needed to see what these two are doing 😉⁠⁠Knight Inlet, First Nations Territory, Traditional Territories of the Kwakwaka'wakw People, British Columbia, Canada.⁠ ⁠⁠📸 Photo Credit: @RolfHickerPhotography⁠ Shot with a 200-600mm lens on a Sony a7Riv, cropped.⁠
🗣️ Distinct Dialects: Each Orca pod has its own unique vocalizations, or dialects, which they use for communication. These dialects are passed down through generations, highlighting the cultural richness of these marine communities.⁠⁠Northern resident orca whale pod (killer whales, Orcinus orca) travelling through Blackfish Sound on a beautiful late afternoon with scenic vancouver Island Mountains as a backdrop, First Nations Territory, Traditional Territories of the Kwakwaka'wakw People, British Columbia, Canada.⁠⁠📸 Photo Credit: @RolfHickerPhotography⁠ Shot with a 200-600mm lens on a Sony a7Riv, cropped.⁠
👀 Respectful Encounters: As stewards of the ocean, we believe in ethical and responsible wildlife watching practices. Join us in experiencing the wonder of Orca while minimizing disturbance and respecting their natural behaviors and habitats.⁠⁠Northern resident killer whale (orca) male surfacing during sunset light in Johnstone Strait of northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.⁠⁠⁠📸 Photo Credit: @RolfHickerPhotography⁠ Shot with a 200-600mm lens on a Sony a7Riv, cropped.⁠
⚠️ Protecting Grizzly Habitat: Grizzly bears face threats from habitat loss, human-wildlife conflict, and climate change. Conservation efforts are vital to ensuring their survival and preserving the ecosystems they call home.⁠⁠We talk about this a lot on our tours because education is a huge part of the memory making experiences we provide for our guests - want to learn more? We're taking bookings for 2025 😉 #NextFamilyHolidaySorted #WeGotYou⁠⁠Knight Inlet, First Nations Territory, Traditional Territories of the Kwakwaka'wakw People, British Columbia, Canada.⁠ @rolfhickerphototours ⁠⁠
🧐Can you see it?⁠⁠We take in some spectacular sights on our tours and we of course love watching wildlife but there is a reason all these gorgeous animals live here and the landscape is captivating and alive with hidden treasures everywhere you look. Don't believe us? Come see for yourselves. ⁠⁠Face within an waterfall at Cascade Point in beautiful Knight Inlet, First Nations Territory, Great Bear Rainforest, British Columbia, Canada.⁠⁠
🐋 Fun Fact: Did you know humpback whales are known for their acrobatic displays? Witnessing these gentle giants breach out of the water is a breathtaking sight off the coast of Vancouver Island. 🌊 #WhaleWatching #HumpbackWhales #ExploreBC⁠⁠Humpback whale breaching in front of the beautiful scenery of the British Columbia Coastal Mountains near the Broughton Archipelago, First Nations Territory, British Columbia, Canada⁠⁠📸 Photo Credit: @RolfHickerPhotography⁠ Shot with a 200-600mm lens on a Sony a7Riv, cropped.⁠
👩‍👧‍👦 Maternal Care: Grizzly bear mothers are fiercely protective of their cubs, often staying with them for up to three years before they venture out on their own. During this time, mothers teach their cubs essential survival skills, including hunting and foraging.⁠⁠Grizzly bear mom with her cub (2nd year) feeding along the low tideline in Knight Inlet, First Nations Territory, Traditional Territories of the Kwakwaka'wakw People, British Columbia, Canada.⁠⁠📸 Photo Credit: @RolfHickerPhotography⁠ Shot with a 200-600mm lens on a Sony a7Riv, cropped.⁠
🍽️ Diverse Diet: Despite their name, Killer Whales are not indiscriminate predators. The Northern Residents primarily feed on fish, with Chinook salmon being a favorite delicacy. Surfing while fishing is a common sight, showcasing their agility and hunting prowess.⁠⁠Female killer whale breaching in Johnstone Strait off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.⁠⁠📸 Photo Credit: @RolfHickerPhotography⁠ Shot with a 200-600mm lens on a Sony a7Riv, cropped.⁠